Read and post comments

Student Teaching at W.B. Saul High School

Share

Posted on December 17, 2018 by Emily Rose Cullen '19, a Delaware Valley University agriculture education major.

Courtesy: Emily Rose Cullen '19 Emily Rose Cullen '19 is a Delaware Valley University agriculture education major, who was selected to be a student teacher at W. B. Saul High School in Philadelphia. 

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines the word teacher as “one whose occupation is to instruct,” but what the dictionary forgot within that definition is the word "passionate," or “showing or caused by strong feelings or a strong belief.” That is how I feel about teaching the future generations about agriculture.

As I continue my studies of agriculture education at Delaware Valley University, I sometimes find myself surprised that this is my career path.

Before college, I never even thought about the possibility of becoming a teacher, let alone an agriculture teacher. I did not come from an agriculture background, and I always saw myself going to vet school. Upon coming to college, and having experienced an amazing agriscience teacher, Mr. Piekarski, I decided that education, specializing in agriscience, was something that I wanted to pursue.  

I will be applying my education as a student teacher at W. B. Saul High School in Philadelphia. W.B. Saul High School has a long history and a rich tradition in agriculture. 

W.B. Saul High School has had many names. When the agriculture curriculum was brought to the current location, the high school was called Wissahickon Farm School. In 1957, it became The Philadelphia High School of Agriculture & Horticulture. In 1966, the building became the W. B. Saul High School, named after Walter Biddle Saul, who during his tenure on the Philadelphia Board of Education, was a huge supporter of the agriculture and horticulture program.

Student teaching at a high school with an amazing agriculture program is an opportunity that I would have never expected had you asked me about student teaching freshman year. I am very excited that the students also come from an urban background, just as I did. The program is often the students' first exposure to agriculture. I look forward to being able to be a lifelong learner. I am also looking forward to being able to teach and share my experiences with students who are interested in learning about agriculture. I hope that I can inspire students the way my agriscience teacher inspired me.

About the Author
Emily Rose Cullen '19 is a Delaware Valley University agriculture education major, who was selected to be a student teacher at W. B. Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences in Philadelphia. She is also involved in Sigma Alpha; DelVal Collegiate FFA; Block and Bridle and; Kappa Delta Pi, an international honor society for education.