News

Film screening and director discussion

The screening will be held Thursday, Sept. 24 at 4:30 p.m. in the University’s Life Sciences Building.

Sep 22, 2015

Delaware Valley University’s Food Systems Institute and its Precarious Alliance Series are pleased to present a free, public screening of “Soil, Struggle and Justice: Agroecology in the Brazilian Landless Movement.” The screening will be held Thursday, Sept. 24 at  4:30 p.m. in the University’s Life Sciences Building. The screening will be followed by a discussion with the film’s director, Andreas Hernandez at 6 p.m.

This film examines a cooperative of the Brazilian Landless Movement in Brazil, which struggled for access to land and then transitioned to ecological agriculture, or agroecology. This cooperative is demonstrating the possibility of an alternative model of flourishing rural life, which provides thriving livelihoods for farmers, produces high quality and low cost food for the region and rehabilitates the earth.

Hernandez, the film’s director, is chair of the Department of International Studies at Marymount Manhattan College. He has a background in social work and music and holds a doctorate in development sociology from Cornell University. He is interested in emerging worldviews and practices for a more just and sustainable world.

About the Sponsors:

Delaware Valley University Food Systems Institute
The purpose of Delaware Valley University’s Food Systems Institute is to develop, foster and encourage cross-disciplinary collaboration and education on all aspects of food production and manufacturing in all schools and departments at the University. Seminars are organized and moderated by the University's faculty with the aim of introducing how food is produced and manufactured. They are the beginning of the conversation on agriculture and food between faculty, staff, students and community members. All sessions are open to the public and are free of charge.

The Precarious Alliance
The Precarious Alliance is a multidisciplinary sustainability symposia series dedicated to exploring the array of complex challenges associated with adapting human networks to address environmental degradation, economic instability, and social inequalities. This year’s event, “Land and the American Dream,” which will be held Oct. 14 through Oct. 16, will examine how competing visions and versions of The American Dream have contributed to an ongoing “precarious alliance” among competing economic, social, and environmental concerns. The symposium will be dedicated to exploring the variety of solutions that can contribute to a new, more sustainable American Dream.