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DelVal students help create a new park honoring veterans

Nov 10, 2014

Veterans Park

Credit: Delaware Valley College. From Left: Jake Petersen ’17, DelVal Assistant Professor Howard Eyre, Mark Constable ’17 and Wes Franken ’16 working on the Plumstead Township Veterans Park.

Delaware Valley College students helped create a new park in Plumsteadville, Pennsylvania to honor veterans, which was dedicated on Saturday, Nov. 8.  The new Plumstead Veterans Park is shaped like a yellow ribbon, a traditional symbol of support for veterans. It includes a stage and a lawn area for events and gatherings and also features information about the branches of the military so that visitors can learn about the branches of service and their histories. George Christiansen ’11 designed the yellow ribbon concept for the park as a student. Michael Fleischacker, chair of DelVal’s Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Sciences, served as his advisor.


“It’s about honoring and celebrating all veterans and what they’ve done for all of us,” said Fleischacker. “It has been really rewarding collaborating with the township on this project and we’re grateful that they gave our students an opportunity to be part of something so significant.”

DelVal’s student chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, advised by DelVal Assistant Professor Howard Eyre and the Landscape Nursery Club, advised by Fleischacker contributed time to the project. The students contributed more than 250 hours of volunteer work. The following students donated their time and skills to make the park possible: Dakota Brosseau ’18, Mark Constable ’17, Will Fox ’15, Wes Franken ’16,  Evan Fritz ’16, Todd Grace ’18, Sal Indelicato ’17 Matt Janisch ’15, Bill Kloos ’16, Pat McDonough ’16, Kayla Mosebrook ’15, Jake Peterson ’17, Marissa Saul ’18, and Gina Villante ’15.

The idea for the project came from several veterans from the township who wanted to honor fellow veterans including Plumstead Township Supervisor and military veteran Dan Hilferty. They reached out to DelVal to help with a park. Working on the project gave DelVal faculty a chance to teach the students about design and construction in a very hands-on way and gave the students a chance to apply what they’re learning in class. Students also got to see the logistics of taking a project from the design stage to completion.

“Not only is it a really good service project, it’s been a really good learning experience for the students,” said Eyre. “They interacted with the township supervisors and the contractors for the project and really represented DelVal well. It was a marvelous learning experience. It allowed our students to see not only the triumphs, but also the challenges of taking a design through to the construction process.”